Skip to main content

Over 6 lakh people die every year by passive smoking: WHO

Secondhand smoke is estimated to cause more than 600,000 deaths a year worldwide, 165,000 of them among children younger than 5, according to a World Health Organisation research group.

The group urged policymakers to immediately enforce the global body's framework convention on tobacco control to create smoke-free environments in all indoor workplaces as well as in public places and on public transport.

The study, which the group claims is the first global estimate of deaths from the exposure to secondhand smoke, was recently released in British medical journal The Lancet.

Analysing data from 192 countries, the group found that 40 per cent of children younger than 15, 35 per cent of female nonsmokers and 33 per cent of male nonsmokers were exposed to secondhand smoke worldwide in 2004.

This exposure led to heart disease, respiratory infections, asthma and lung cancer, resulting in 603,000 deaths that year, accounting for about 1.0 per cent of worldwide deaths, it said.

About 60 per cent of the 165,000 child deaths occurred in Africa and South Asia. As children's exposure to secondhand smoke most likely happened at home, the combination of infectious diseases and tobacco seems to be a deadly combination for children in these regions, the group said.

Smokers are not only putting themselves at risk, but also the 1.8 billion nonsmokers, the group said, concluding that some 5.7 million deaths per year worldwide are attributable to tobacco including passive smoking, combined with an estimated 5.1 million deaths among smokers due to tobacco-related causes.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

"Facebook Tests a New Feature To Let Users Enjoy Events Togather"

Facebook is testing a new feature to let users share events that they are interesting in attending to, on their "Stories" so that they can coordinate with friends and enjoy events together.

According to a TechCrunch report, the test will involve a new option to "Share to Your Story" that appears when you visit an event's page on Facebook.

"If shared, friends will see a tappable sticker within your Story that includes the event details and lets friends respond that they're also 'interested' right from the Story itself," the report added.

Friends also can tap on the sticker in the Story to visit the event page.

"There's also a link to the event page built in and a way to start a group chat on Messenger with friends who responded," said The Verge.

The test is currently rolling out to users in the US, Mexico and Brazil.

To use the new test feature, go to the Events page, click "Share" below the date and time of the eve…

Largest Spike in Hate Crimes Since 9/11, Says a Report

The number of hate crimes reported in the United States jumped by 17% last year, the largest increase since 2001 when the terrorist hijackings on 9/11 fueled a surge in attacks on Americans of Muslim and Arab ancestry.

A total of 7,175 hate crime incidents were reported to the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program in 2017, up from 6,121 in 2016, said the UCR Program's annual Hate Crime Statistics report, Xinhua reported.

It's the third year in a row the FBI has reported an increase in hate crimes. The number of hate crimes in 2016 rose about five percent from 2015.

The 2017 incidents encompass 8,437 total offences, meaning some involved multiple criminal charges.

According to the report, the most common bias categories in single-bias incidents were race/ethnicity/ancestry (59.6 percent), religion (20.6 percent), and sexual orientation (15.8 percent).

The victims represented a cross section of society, with African-Americans and Jews the most frequently targeted victims. Of 34…

2.2 bn Facebook Users Must Log Out, Re-login Across Devices, Says Experts

After Facebook admitted that hackers broke into nearly 50 million users' accounts by stealing their "access tokens" or digital keys, cyber experts on Saturday warned over 2.3 billion users to log out and log back into Facebook, or any of third-party apps that use Facebook login.

Facebook has reset the access tokens of almost 50 million accounts it knew were affected. It has also taken the precautionary step of resetting access tokens for another 40 million accounts that have been subject to "View As" look-up in the last year.

"For now, logging out and back in is all that is necessary. The truly concerned should use this as a reminder and an opportunity to review all of their security and privacy settings on Facebook and all other social media platforms," Chester Wisniewski, Principal Research Scientist with global cyber security major Sophos, told.

According to Dr Gary McGraw, Vice President of Security Technology, Synopsys (Software Integrity Group)…